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  THE PENINSULAR WAR
  In January the 1st 1809 Battalion sailed for
the Peninsular. It consisted of 43 officers, 71 sergeants, 20 drummers, 1,214 rank and file and 18 women, organized into ten companies. It was to serve under the Duke of Wellington for five years of continuous action in Spain and Portugal, during which it added to the Colours five battle honours and not only upheld the traditions of the Regiment but gained a reputation unsurpassed by any.
Its first action was the Passage of the River Douro in the
face of Marshal Soult’s Army.  At Talavera in July
the French were defeated with loss, and it was recorded in General Orders that “the Charge made by the Brigade of Guards on the enemies’ attacking columns was a most gallant one.” The 1st Battalion lost 24 killed and 267 wounded in this battle, which is a battle honour for the Regiment .  Whilst the 1st Battalion was thus engaged in Spain, part of the 2nd Battalion took part in the ill-fated Waicheran expedition in Holland, where its casualties from sickness were far graver than those at Talavera, though it never fired ashot.
1810 Soon after its return, three’ companies were sent out with two of the Coldstream to form a composite battalion for the reinforcement of Cadiz, then besieged by the French. Meanwhile, the 1st Battalion saw action at the Battle of Bussaco in September and in the defence of the Lines of Torres Vedras covering Lisbon.
1811 The companies of the 2nd Battalion in Cadiz took part in an audacious enterprise to break the seige and won the Regiment another battle honour. Landing behind their besiegers, 4,000 of the garrison attacked 10,000 French at Barrosa, and defeated them in less than two hours. The report of this fierce battle states “how gloriously the Brigade of Guards maintained the high character of His Majesty’s Household Troops”.
At Fuentes d’Onor in May the 1st Battalion won the year’s second battle honour for the Regiment, and in the following year, 1812, it added Salamanca. It was also involved in the seige of Burgos, at the Battle of Vittoria and at the Crossing of the Bidassoa in October, 1813.
By this time Wellington had driven Napoleon from Spain and the last great battle of the Peninsular War was fought on French soil on the banks of the River Nive, where the brunt of the five days’ fighting fell upon the Guards Brigade. Here the 1st Battalion won another battle honour for the Regiment.
1814 At the crossing of the next river, the Adour, in February, “a handful of Coldstream and Third Guards” were first to cross, supported by a battery of rockets. The Siege of Bayonne followed, and in the last action of the war the 1st Battalion held at bay the final desperate sortie of the French and repelled it, though at heavy cost. For this and many other actions the battle honour Peninsula was granted.

* Awarded to the Regiment as a battle honour in 1951
 
 

THE WATERLOO CAMPAIGN 1813

 

Having played the minor part in the Peninsular Campaign, it was the turn of the 2nd Battalion to represent the Regiment at the climax of
the Napoleonic Wars. It had been sent on the expedition to the Netherlands in 1813, where its assault and ladder parties had displayed great gallantry at the Siege of Bergen-Op-Zoom, and it was stationed near Brussels when Napoleon advanced towards that city in June, 1815. After a march of twenty-seven miles in fifteen hours, it went straight into action at Quatre Bras.
At the glorious crowning victory of Waterloo on 18th June, 1815, the 2nd Battalion was on the ridge behind the farm of Hougoumont, with its Light Company in the farm buildings with those of the Coldstream and of the two battalions of First Guards. Throughout the long day, from eleven o’clock in the morning until eight o’clock in the evening, these four companies, and subsequently the whole of the 2nd Battalion of Coldstream and Third Guards frustrated the desperate attempts of nearly 30,000 French to
capture this key position. No finer feat is recorded in the history of the Regiment than this defence of Hougoumont against overwhelming odds.
One historian, Robinson, has written: “probably the gallantry of the defenders of this post has never been surpassed on any battlefield.”
The great Duke of Wellington himself wrote: “The success of the Battle of Waterloo turned on the closing of the gates of Hougoumont.” In recognition of this service the Prince Regent granted to Ensigns of the Foot Guards the double rank of Lieutenant, thus completing a system which for the Regiment had begun in 1691, and which was eventually abolished by Royal Warrant in 1871.
 

  1820 ACCESSION OF KING GEORGE IV
  1820 The 2nd Battalion served in Portugal until-1828.
 
  1830 ACCESSION OF KING WILLIAM IV
  1831 Shortly after his Accession King Wi!liam restored to the
Regiment its Scottish title, and the Third Guards became Scots Fusilier Guards. In the following year the whole Regiment took into wear bearskin caps, which since 1778 had been worn by Grenadier companies. Dark grey trousers—white in summer— had already taken the place of white breeches and black gaiters in 1823, and in 1820 the short coat worn since 1795 had been replaced by swallow-tailed coatees with epaulettes. This uniform was worn until 1856, when were abolished and tunics broadly similar today were introduced.

 
 

1837 ACCESSION OF QUEEN VICTORIA

 

THE CRIMEAN WAR, 1854-55
The long peace ended in 1854, when war was 1854 declared on Russia, and the 1st Battalion sailed with the Guards Brigade for the East.
Weakened by cholera and dysentery after months of inactivity in Malta, Turkey and Bulgaria, the Battalion eventually landed in the Crimea and at once distinguished itself at the Battle of the Alma, where in the defence of the Colours four of the first Victoria Crosses were won*In November, in the fog and confusion of the Battle of Inkerman, the Battalion once again showed its mettle in driving off with desperate bayonet charges for six long hours greatly superior forces of Russian infantry.
These two battle honours and that of Sevastopol are borne on the Colours to commemorate the gallantry of this Battalion, who endured not only the fury of two great battles and a desperate siege, but also the appalling rigours of a Russian winter for which they were entirely ill equipped and wholly unprepared.

CANADA AND EGYPT

One pipe major and five pipers were officially  authorized for each battalion in 1856.
The 2nd Battalion formed part of a force sent 1861 to Canada to reinforce the frontier during the American Civil War. Its three year visit was spent mainly in garrison duty in Montreal.

Queen Victoria restored to the Regiment its 1877 previous title of Scots Guards.

The 1st Battalion took part in the expedition 1882 to Egypt under Sir Garnet Wolseley to suppress the revolt of Arabi Pasha, gaining for the regiment the battle honours “Tel-el-Kebir” and “Egypt 1882.” In this campaign the Regiment wore scarlet in battle and carried Colours to the seat of the war for the last time.
The Regiment was represented in the expedition for the relief of General Gordon in Khartoum by two companies in the Guards Camel Regiment, which fought most gallantly at Abu Klea, Gubat and Metemneh. At the former battle in January, 1885, the main charge of the Dervishes broke one face of the British square, but the Guards on the further side “faced about, stood like rocks and allowed nothing to pass”.
In the same year the 2nd Battalion was sent with the expedition to Suakin, where it saw little fighting but gained a further battle honour before returning home, via Cyprus, in less than nine months.
* See the Origin and History of Scots Guards Pipers in the Standard Settings of Scots Guards Pipe Music.                                            1887 In commemoration of her Golden Jubilee, Queen Victoria granted to the Regiment a further three company badges, which, with the thirteen issuecj by Queen Anne, allowed one badge to each of the eight companies which since 1881 had formed the establishment of the battalions.
In commemoration of her Diamond Jubilee in 1899,
Queen Victoria presented to the Regiment at a parade of both battalions at Windsor Castle a State Colour.
 

 

THE SOUTH AFRICAN WAR, 1899-1902

  The 1st Battalion, thirty officers and 1,088 other ranks strong, sailed for Cape Town and was soon in action at Modder River, which it gained as a battle honour for the Regiment.
At home the 3rd Battalion Scots Guards was formed for the first time, and eight new company badges were approved by the Sovereign and taken into use by this Battalion.
In 1900 the 2nd Battalion joined the 1st Battalion in South Africa at an equal strength. For the next two years it was to operate as part
of the Eighth Division, known as “Rundle’s Greyhounds,” in the general area of the town of Harrismith, against elusive Boer Commandos.
Two companies of Mounted Infantry were formed from the Brigade of Guards for service in South Africa, and the Regiment was well represented in both.
 
 

1901 ACCESSION OF KING EDWARD VII

   Who became the first Colonel-in-Chief of the Scots Guards, an appointment in which he has been followed by successive Sovereigns. In May he presented Colours to the 3rd Battalion on Horse Guards Parade.
The 1st and 2nd Battalions returned home late in 1902, having lost 287 all ranks throughout the war, but without yielding to the Boers a single prisoner. For its services the Regiment was awarded the battle honour “South Africa, 1899-1902”.
Government economy in 1906 caused the disbandment of the 3rd Battalion, which handed back its Colours to King Edward VII.
The Scots Guards Association was formed in 1907.

  1910 ACCESSION OF KING GEORGE V
  A small party of the 1st Battalion took part in the famous Siege of Sydney Street in 1911. This battalion then served for two years in Egypt, returning in January, 1913.

 WORLD WAR ONE, 1914-18          Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Regi1914 ment served on the Western Front from 1914 until the Armistice in 1918. The former left England in August, 1914, as part of the 1st Brigade of the First Division in the original B.E.F.—”The Old Contemptibles”— and took part in the desperate defensive battles of the first months of the war. The 2nd Battalion left England in October, 1914, in the 20th Brigade of the Seventh Division. In July, 1915, on the formation of the Guards Division, the 1st Battalion joined 2nd Guards Brigade, and the 2nd Battalion 3rd Guards Brigade. Between them they gained for the Regiment thirty-three battle honours, of which the following are borne on the Colours: “Retreat from Mons”, “Marne 1914”, “Aisne”, “Ypres 1914”, “Ypres 1917”, “Festubert 1915”, “Loos”, “Somme 1916”, “Somme 1918”, “Cambrai 1917”, “Cambrai 1918”, “Hindenburg Line”, “France and Flanders 1914-18”.
Five Victoria Crosses were awarded to the Regiment during this war. 111 officers and 2,730 other ranks lost their lives. The 3rd Battalion was re-formed for the duration of this war and served in London

BETWEEN THE GREAT WARS

InNovember, 1918, the title “Guardsman” was introduced to replace that of “Private” in the Brigade of Guards.
Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions returned from Cologne in 1919 and marched through London with the Guards Division (D 3). In 1926 King George V ordered the pipers of the Regiment to wear feather bonnets.   1927
The 2nd Battalion sailed for China, where it spent two years in Hong Kong and Shanghai
.
In 1934 a Scots Guards Exhibition was held in London. The alliance between the Regiment and the Winnipeg Grenadiers was approved in this same year.
1935
Italy’s designs on Abyssinia caused the 1st Battalion to be sent to Egypt for thirteen months from November, 1935. Whilst it was there the 2nd Battalion paid a three-month visit to Palestine to deal with the Arab revolt, returning in December, 1936

 

1936 ACCESSION AND SUBSEQUENT ABDICATION OF         KING EDWARD VIII

 
 
  ACCESSION Of KING GEORGE VI
  Who, as Duke of York, had been since 1932 twenty-fourth-Colonel of the Scots Guards.
1938 In November, having spent some three weeks packed and labelled for Czechoslovakia, the 2nd Battalion left for what was intended to be a routine two-year tour of duty in Egypt. It eventually returned home in 1944.

* Members of the 2nd Battalion received the General Service Medal with clasp “Palestine.”
 
 

WORLD WAR Two, 1939-45

  The 1st Battalion served in the campaigns in 1939 Norway, in North Africa and in Italy, including the Anzio Landing. The 2nd Battalion served in Africa from the Western Desert to Tunisia, in Italy including the Salerno Landing, and in North West Europe. The 3rd Battalion fought in Churchill tanks from Normandy to the Elbe. The 4th Battalion, formed in 1941 but disbanded before it could go overseas, found two independent companies, who fought in Italy and North West Europe respectively, “S” Company with 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards and “X” Company first with the 3rd Battalion Irish Guards and subsequently with 1st Battalion Welsh Guards. Between them these battalions and companies gained for the Regiment forty-one battle honours, of which the following are borne on the Colours:
“North Africa 1941-43”, “Gazala” , “Medenine”, “Djebel bou Aoukaz 1943, I”, “Italy 1943-45”, “Monte Camino”, “Anzio”, “North West Europe 1944-45”, “Quarry Hill”, “Rhineland”.
Captain The Lord Lyell was awarded a posthumous
Victoria Cross whilst serving with the 1st Battalion in
Tunisia. Ninety-eight officers and 943 other ranks of the Regiment lost their lives between 1939 and 1945.
At home the 5th Battalion was raised in 1940 as a ski battalion to fight against the Russians in Finland, but after training in France it was disbanded. The Holding Battalion existed for three years from April, 1940, and the Training Battalion was located at Pirbright for the duration of the war. *
In May, 1945, the 1st Battalion moved into 1945 Trieste, where until its return home in October,
1947, it was involved in holding the Morgan Line against the Yugoslav claim to the Venezia Giulia.
* The war precluded any large-scale celebration of the Tercentenary of the Regiment in 1942, but a special programme was broadcast by the B.B.C., an historical pageant was enacted at Pirbright,and the 2nd Battalion had a day’s holiday in the Western Desert.

 
  POST-WORLD WAR Two
  The 2nd Battaion remained as part of the British
Occupation Force in Germany until its return home in
December, 1946. During this time it found the British
Guard of Honour at the Potsdam Peace Conference and
accepted the surrender of Heligoland.
The 3rd Battalion, after handing in its tanks in June and reverting to infantry, was finally disbanded in January, 1946. Its Colours were handed back to the Sovereign for the third time for safe keeping.
1948 As a Government economy measure, the 1st
Battalion assumed the role of Guards Training Battalion at Pirbright for three years until April, 1951. At this time the Guards Independent Company, The Parachute Regiment, was formed with a proportion of Scots Guardsmen.
In September the 2nd Battalion left at short notice for Malaya, where it was to be occupied in operations against Communist terrorists until its return home in May, 1951.
Six officers and eight other ranks of the Battalion lost
their lives during these operations.
In November, 1951, the 1st Battalion moved by air and sea to Cyprus. In this year an alliance between the Regiment and the 3rd Battallion The Royal Australian Regiment was approved
.
 
  1952 ACCESSION OF QUEEN ELIZABETH II
  In February the 1st Battalion made an emergency move to Port Said, where, except for five months at Moascar, it was to stay until the evacuation of the Suez Canal Zone brought it home in December, 1954.
In July, 1953, the 2nd Battalion moved to the British Army of the Rhine in Germany, where it was to remain until it returned home in February, 1957. The 1st Battalion mobilized with reservists at Lydd in Kent, in 1956 and embarked its vehicles and heavy equipment to take part in the Suez operation. In the event the Battalion did not leave England.1958 The Brigade of Guards Junior Guardsmen’s Company was formed at Pirbright, and the Regimental Junior Pipers began to be trained at the Piping School, formed there in 1954.
After a period of tension, during which it was under orders to move by air at short notice to the Middle East, the 1st Battalion moved in November for a tour of duty in Germany which lasted until November, 1960.
The 2nd Battalion was warned for service in Cyprus in
1959, but the situation there improved sufficiently for it
not to be required. It flew to Cyrenaica in early 1960 for
a short exercise in the Tmimi-Derna area.
1961 The Regiment in its entirety, with representatives from all branches of the Scots Guards Association, was reviewed on Horse Guards Parade by H.R.H. The Duke of Gloucester in celebration of his twenty-fifth year as twenty-fifth Colonel of the Regiment.
1962 In February, the 2nd Battalion, reinforced by No. 3 Company Irish Guards, flew to Kenya, where until late 1964 it operated in aid of the Civil Power in that country and in Uganda and Zanzibar. After taking part in the Kenya Independance celebrations, it returned to Caterham.
1964 The 1st Battalion, reinforced by No. 9 Company Irish Guards which included a platoon of Coldstreamers, was posted to Malaysia. They carried out two operational tours against the Indonesians in Sarawak and in Sabah, returning in early 1967 to Redford Barracks, Edinburgh. Apart from the 2nd Battalion’s period at Hawick in 1944/45, this was the first posting of a battalion of the Regiment to Scotland for 250 years. Their duties included the Edinburgh Castle and Balmoral Guards. Half the battalion went to Jamaica for training in 1968.
1967 The 2nd Battalion was posted to the 1967 British Army of the Rhine in 1967 for the first time in a mechanised infantry role, initially to Iserlohn and in 1968 to Munster. Their training included six weeks in the Libyan desert. Returning to Windsor in 1970, the Battalion was moved at short notice to Northern Ireland, the first and shortest of many subsequent Regimental postings to that Province.

1970 On 31st March, 1971, the 2nd Battalion was placed in suspended animation as part of the Defence cuts, and remained so until, on a change of Government, it was reformed in Edinburgh in January, 1972. In the interval, F Company joined the 1st Battalion Irish Guards in Hong Kong, S Company served independently in British Honduras and later joined 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, and the 2nd Battalion Company moved to Edinburgh. On 21st April, 1972, a service of re-dedication was held in St. Giles Cathedral and the Battalion became operational on 1st July.
During the 1970s and early 1980s both battalions of the Regiment completed four four-month operational tours in Northern Ireland, and for eighteen months from March
1980 the 1st Battalion was stationed at Aldergrove, near
Belfast. S
1975 The 2nd Battalion was stationed in Belize
for five months.
1979 The Regiment, complete, with representatives of all branches of the Scots Guards Association, was reviewed on Horse Guards
Parade by H.R.H. The Duke of Kent, who had succeeded his uncle as 26th Colonel of the Regiment in 1974.
1981 The 1st Battalion flew with its families to Hong Kong for a two-year posting.
1982 Regimental Headquarters moved back to Wellington Barracks after an eight-year sojourn in Bloomsbury.
The 2nd Battalion sailed for the South Atlantic in the Cunard Liner QE2 on 12th May as part of 5th Infantry Brigade.tThe Battalion landed at San Carlos, East Falkiand on 2nd June. They captured Mount Tumbledown following a night attack on 14th June. Eight members of the Battalion lost their lives in the action and 41 were wounded. The Battalion returned to the United Kingdom on 10th August

1982 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards posted to Hong Kong. Battalion exercise in Fiji,
Malaysia and Australia over the next 2 years.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards posted in Chelsea Barracks London. During this  time the Battalion go to war in the Falkland Islands.

1984 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards return from Hong Kong and are posted to Elizabeth  Barracks, Pirbright.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards move to Episkopi Barracks, Cyprus on 2 year  posting.

1986 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards Troops its colour on Queens Birthday Parade.
1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 4 month emergency tour of South  Armagh, Northern Ireland.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards move to Hounslow, London on 4 year posting.

1987 - 1st Battalion Scots Guards are presented with new colours by HM Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace.
1st Battalion participates on Queens Birthday Parade.

2nd Battalion Scots Guards move to Hounslow, London on 4 year posting.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards Troops its colour on HM Queens Birthday Parade.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 4 month emergency tour of South  Armagh, Northern Ireland.
2nd Battalion deploy to USA on 6 week exercise.

1988 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards move to Hohne in West Germany on 5 year posting.
1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 week Mechanised Infantry exercise to Canada.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards are presented with new colours by HM Queen  Elizabeth at Hopeton House, Edinburgh.

1989 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deployed on 4 month emergency tour to East Tyrone, Northern Ireland.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards deploy to Canada on 6 week exercise.
RF and G Company deploy on 6 month post to Belize, Central America with 1st Battalion Irish Guards.

1990 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy to Canada for 6 week Mechanised Infantry  exercise.
1st Battalion Scots Guards convert from 432 Mechanised Infantry to Warrior Armoured Infantry.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 month operational tour of East Tyrone,  Northern Ireland.

1991 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy to the Gulf on Operation Granby.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards participate on Queens Birthday Parade.

1992 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 month operational tour of Belfast.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards move to Edinburgh on 2 year posting.

2nd Battalion Scots Guards provide the Royal Guard at Balmoral.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards participate in Edinburgh Military Tattoo.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards move from Redford Barracks to newly built Dreghorn Barracks in Edinburgh.
The Regiment celebrate its 350th anniversary on the grounds of Hollyrood  Palace, Edinburgh.

1993 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards move to the newly built Victoria Barracks, Windsor.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 week exercise to Canada.
LF deploy on 6 week exercise to Oman.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards on 4th November placed into suspended animation and join the 1st Battalion in Windsor.
2nd Battalion Scots Guards provide the Guard of Honour for the installation  of the new Governor of Edinburgh Castle.
F Company with the 2nd Battalion Colours form up at Wellington Barracks, London.

1994 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 month operational tour of East Tyrone,  Northern Ireland.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

1995 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards troops its colour on Queens Birthday Parade. 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 week exercise to Canada. F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

1996 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy on 6 month operational tour of Belfast.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

1997 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards participates in the Queens Birthday Parade.
RF deploy on 3 week exercise to Madrid, Spain.
F Company troops its colour on Queens Birthday Parade.

1998 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards deploy to Ballykinler, Northern Ireland on 2 year post. Next 2 years see the Battalion deploy to Drumcree for Civil Disorder disturbances.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

2000 – 1st Battalion Scots Guards posted to Wellington Barracks, London on 3 year  post.
Battalion deploy to Northern Ireland for the Drumcree Civil Disorder.
Battalion deploy on 6 week exercise to Kenya.
LF deploy to Sierra Leonne from Kenya.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

2001 – Battalion deploy to Northern Ireland for the Drumcree Civil Disorder.
Battalion deploy to Belfast on an emergency 4 month tour. B Company Remain for 6 months.
Battalion participate on Queen’s Birthday Parade.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

2002 – Battalion and F Company presented with new colours by HM Queen in  Windsor.
Battalion troops its colour on Queens Birthday parade.
Battalion and F Company plays leading role in the funeral of HM Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.
Battalion and F Company deploy on Op Fresco – Firefighting duties in London.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

2003 - Battalion participates on Queens Birthday Parade.
1st Battalion Scots Guards posted to Munster, Germany on 6 year post.
F Company deploy on exercise to Kazakhstan.
F Company participates on the Queens Birthday Parade.

2004 – The year will see the Battalion exercise in Canada before deploying on  operations in the latter part of the year.
F Company deploy on exercise to Spain.



 

 
  Sergeant A Fraser 2nd Battalion, engaging Colonel Cubieres at Hougoumont